This is an archived version of the Virtual Volunteering Project web site from January 2001.
The materials on the web site were written or compiled by Jayne Cravens.
The Virtual Volunteering Project has been discontinued.
The Virtual Volunteering Project web site IS NO LONGER UPDATED.
Email addresses associated with the Virtual Volunteering Project are no longer valid.
For any URL that no longer works, type the URL into archive.org
.
For new materials regarding online volunteering, see
Jayne Cravens' web site (the section on volunteerism-related resources).
 
 
 
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working with online volunteers
who have disabilities:

recruitment

 
Before you start recruiting volunteers for your organization, you need to make sure you are ready to place these volunteers immediately into an orientation, intitial evaluation and assignment-matching process. If you are not to ready to start immediately matching volunteers with assignments, you are not ready to recruit volunteers. The Virtual Volunteering Project has a self-evaluation to help you determine if your are ready to institute an online volunteering program.

You can reach people with disabilities via your general virtual volunteering recruitment methods. However, there are several ways you can outreach specifically to these audiences. Send your volunteer opportunities to:

  • schools that work specifically with disabled populations
  • independent living centers
  • vocational rehabilitation agencies
  • disability service groups
  • regional offices of rehabilitation services of the department of Health, Education and Welfare.
  • Internet discussion groups, as appropriate
Your recruitment message should be the same as it is for all volunteers, in that it should explicitly state that the organization is committed to placing individuals into the volunteer setting which best matches their interests with the needs of the organization.

 
Other parts of this resource:

 
Credits

Some of this information was adapted from other sources, which offer excellent additional information about working with volunteers with disabilities, on or offline.

We would like to expand the resources on this page, by including others' suggestions and first hand narratives. If you would like to share information with the Virtual Volunteering Project about your own experiences working with volunteers virtually, please contact us.

If you have helped or are helping organizations as a volunteer via your home or work computer, please complete our online survey for volunteers and tell us about your experiences.

Also view


This component of the Virtual Volunteering Project is made possible by a special grant from the Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation. We are most grateful for their support and collaboration.


If you find this or any other Virtual Volunteering Project information helpful, or would like to add information based on your own experience, please contact us.


 
Copyright © 1999 - 2000 The University of Texas at Austin
All Rights Reserved.


 
This is an archived version of the Virtual Volunteering Project web site from January 2001.
The materials on the web site were written or compiled by Jayne Cravens.
The Virtual Volunteering Project has been discontinued.
The Virtual Volunteering Project web site IS NO LONGER UPDATED.
Email addresses associated with the Virtual Volunteering Project are no longer valid.
For any URL that no longer works, type the URL into archive.org
.
For new materials regarding online volunteering, see
Jayne Cravens' web site (the section on volunteerism-related resources).
 

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